Podcast: Ross and Phil Talk… Cannes Film Festival

Podcast: Ross and Phil Talk… Cannes Film Festival

Ross and Phil Talk Movies The Podcasts

On this episode of the podcast (recorded a few weeks after Ross returned from the 2018 Festival) we reminisce about our times at the Cannes festival.  From illegal drugs, meeting some very cool people, annoying photographers, being complicit in a lie with Sky News and confusing a sales agent due to a lack of doors.

Hosted by Award winning Filmmaker Ross Boyask and blogger/writer/failed filmmaker Phil Hobden.

Films Discussed: The Man from Hong Kong, Ten Dead Men, left For Dead, Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith, The Go Go Boys, Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films, Superman 4, American Ninja, Breakdance, Runaway Train, Star Trek: The Wrath Of Khan, Love Object, The Matrix Reloaded, Headrush

For more on Phil Hobden check out www.philhobden.co.uk
For more on Ross Boyask search @RossBoyask on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook

   

Electric Boogaloo The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films – A Quick Capsule Review (Revisited)

Electric Boogaloo The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films – A Quick Capsule Review (Revisited)

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
It’s not often I want a sub two hour film to be longer but Electric Boogaloo The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films is one of those stories that is SO interesting and so intrinsically tied to my childhood love of crappy films that to tell the full story even more in depth across another two hours would have just added to the joy.  If you grew up with a love of cheap exploitation and sci-fi films in the 80’s then chances are you too watched your fair share of Cannon Films, and almost all the key players are interviewed here.  It’s a fascinating, scary and often compelling look at one of the wildest times in film history.  A little more depth and an interview with Golan himself would have made this just perfect.

Best Bit: The final title cards which sum up the Go Go Boys perfectly!

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: Video Nasties,  The Hamster Factory, The Go-Go Boys

 

Rating:

 

Author: Phil Hobden

 

 

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Blog: Electric Boogaloo The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films – A Quick Capsule Review

Blog: Electric Boogaloo The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
It’s not often I want a sub two hour film to be longer but the story of Cannon Films is one of those stories that is SO interesting and so intrinsically tied to my childhood love of crappy films that to tell the full story even more in depth across another two hours would have just added to the joy.  If you grew up with a love of cheap exploitation and sci-fi films in the 80’s then chances are you too watched your fair share of Cannon Films, and almost all the key players are interviewed here.  It’s a fascinating, scary and often compelling look at one of the wildest times in film history.  A little more depth and an interview with Golan himself would have made this just perfect.

Best Bit: The final title cards which sum up the Go Go Boys perfectly!

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: Video Nasties,  The Hamster Factory, The Go-Go Boys

 

Author: Phil Hobden

Blog: All Things Film – Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2015) Reviewed

Blog: All Things Film – Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2015) Reviewed

All Things Film Blog Other Cr*p Uncategorized

Mark Hartley’s talking head documentary, much like his 2008 doc Not Quite Hollywood, centres its attention on the rise and fall of Cannon Films; starting in the seventies with sexploitation pictures, through the eighties with its incredibly fast and furious catalogue of action nonsense, till its inevitable implosion in the early nineties.

Cannon films was the brainchild of Israelis Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus. What was less clear to me, however, was who was who in the process. The film does a remarkably clear and concise job in pinpointing exactly how this process grew and then went wrong. It’s patently clear that the pair were basically chancers, possessing just the right amount of pizzazz and character and ego, yet entirely missing the point of what made audiences tick. We all know people like this – those who absolutely know when they have a bankable idea, with next to credentials. These guys, though, had the temerity to stake their families on it – with mixed success.

An examination such as this can only really tread familiar ground; anyone who isn’t terribly interested in movies knows at least about the rise of Michael Dudikoff in those American Ninja movies; Chuck Norris’s escapades in the MIA series and, of course, all those silly titles like Masters of the Universe and Superman IV. Cannon were, and always be remembered as, the arbiters of misaligned pop culture at the expense of quality.

It’s certainly something to see the likes of Laurene Langdon, Bo Derek, Dolph Lundgren and Dudikoff himself talking head their way through their emotions – amidst a plethora of participants who served as special effects producers, writers, financiers and – at one point – the executive of MGM turns up to say nothing very nice about them during their distribution-heavy period.

It’s fair to say that without Cannon’s canon, we wouldn’t have the likes of the Fast and Furious franchise, or Olympus Has Fallen. The feature spends far more time on Golem – and rightly so. Globus was more the acquisitons and real estate side. He remains with us to this day. More menacing and bizarre, evidently, was Golem; an ungainly, somewhat messianic egocentric who looked like someone had create a waxwork of Rodney Dangerfield, but had forgotten to add water. You have to admire this fanciful buffoon’s ideals – but it was only ever going to have a short shelf life.

Undercutting the competition was so fierce, we’re told, that when the two finally parted ways, they entered in to a race to see who could produce the next Lambada craze movie first. They ended up realising on the same day – quality be damned.

Golem died in 2014. But the film is beautifully summed up when a final title card reveals that when the two were approached to take part in this documentary, they said no and instead rushed our their own, named “The Go Go Boys”. I thought this was one last parting flippant aside. But no, it’s absolutely true. These dudes were out of their tiny little celluloid trees; and it makes for fascinating viewing if you’re a true cinephile.

 

Author: Andrew Mackay

 

To hear more on this review (and others like it) make sure you download the Filmsploitation podcast, part of the All Things Film network.