Shed Of The Dead (2019) – A Quick Capsule Review

Shed Of The Dead (2019) – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Shed Of The Dead  tries hard to be very like a certain other ‘S’ of the Dead.  Hell, it even references the classic Edgar Wright film (and many others) in the rather knowing animated title sequence.  Yup it’s aspirations to be the latest in a long list of Zom-Com’s are set out right from the start and, happily, for the most part it works. Avoiding the pitfalls of other independent Zombie films (mostly trying to do too much with too little), director Cullingham makes the smart choice to focus down hard to the characters rather than the gore, with the money splashed at the right moments and the bad taste humour picking up the slack throughout.  Shed also drags together icons from franchises such as Friday the 13th, Hills Have Eyes and Texas Chainsaw for extended cameos in what turns out to be a clever gimmick – enough screen time to get bums on seats but not enough to distract.  With this and it’s Shaun-esk feel, brisk run time and clever use of budget you have what is a pretty enjoyable Zombie romp. In short: Shed Of The Dead has a great cast, is slick, sick and funny.

Best Bit: Shed Zombie

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: Shaun of The Dead, Anna And The Apocalypse, Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse

 


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Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Other Cr*p Top 5

In a new semi-regular feature each week Phil takes a lookout a different movie related Top Five… this time out: Low Budget Films.

Yup sub $300k movie making at it’s finest.  And bloodiest. It’s no surprise that it’s horror that tends to shine in this budget level, with scares and blood taking the place of cast and effects.  Here are my top 5 low budget films.

Close but no cigar: El Mariachi, Cube, Brick, Bad Taste, Paranormal Activity, Halloween

 

5 – The Evil Dead
Sam Rami followed in The Texas Chainsaw’s shoes , delivering one of the most famous ‘video nasties’ on the 80’s with The Evil Dead, a movie whose characters and legacy still carries on today.  See the original uncut version for the full on Evil Dead experience.

 

4 – Night of The Living Dead
Romero launched a genre with Night of The Living Dead, tacked race politics and scared the bejesus out of people. Night was years ahead of its time and spawned two equally impressive sequels. Today it stands as a key influencer on modern TV and movies.

 

3 – Clerks
Love him or hate him (and mostly hate with his latest few films), Kevin Smith pulled a blinder with Clerks – a mostly one location comedy with memorable dialogue and even more memorable characters.  Made with credit cards, luck and a degree of bullshit Clerks still stands up today as a damn funny, raw movie.

 

2 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Whilst it has dated badly, the original TCM was and still is somewhat of a phenomenon.  Banned in the UK for over twenty years, Chainsaw broke new ground in horror filmmaking with it’s raw handheld style, a style that would influence films like Evil Dead and Blair Witch years later. 

 

1 – Blair Witch Project
Like TCM before it, the directors of Blair Witch would never top their debut film, a film which for a long time was the most profitable movie ever made (overtaken latterly by Paranormal Activity). It launched a sub genre (the found footage film) and showed what you could do with no money but a great idea, presented alongside a one of cinemas best marketing campaigns. Like it or hate it, it changed filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

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Leatherface – A Quick Capsule Review

Leatherface – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Texas Chainsaw was something of a one off.  It helped define a era of extreme, often banned horror films and it’s legend endures today despite numerous remakes, sequels and expansions that have added nothing.  Leatherface, sadly, is another of these.  Expanding the story behind the titular character proves pointless.  It doenst make him scarier.  It just weakens it.  Okay so Leatherface the film is impressively gory for sure but it’s also pointless.  Just watch the original instead and avoid films like this that just blur that original films impact.

Best Bit: It’s pretty extreme 

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Avoid

If You Liked this Try: Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2013)

IMDB Rating: 

 

Author: Phil Hobden

My Favourite… Tobe Hooper Film

My Favourite… Tobe Hooper Film

My Favourite… Other Cr*p

As death continues it’s relentless march through the gifted and talented of TV and film, My Favourite… celebrates those we have lost by taking a look at a slice of their best work. Well sometimes best, sometimes just the one I like the most.

This time out: My Favourite…. Tobe Hooper (1943-2017) Film

[divider]

Poltergeist (1982)

A young family are visited by ghosts in their home. At first the ghosts appear friendly, moving objects around the house to the amusement of everyone, then they turn nasty and start to terrorise the family before they “kidnap” the youngest daughter.

Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist may have has a few issues around who the true director was (Spielberg was rumoured to have had a hand in production) but, these few issues aside, it’s still a damn scary film.  Yes he’ll be known always more for Texas Chainsaw, but Poltergeist was the film that scared me witless as a kid and had me freaked out every time I saw static on the TV.  Sadly Hooper wouldn’t ever top his top most famous early works and in fact made some right ross latter on BUT Poltergeist still stands today as a scary as hell thriller.  Avoid the remake.

 

See also: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Salem’s Lot

 

 

Phil’s Top 5… Slasher Film Villains!

Phil’s Top 5… Slasher Film Villains!

Other Cr*p Top 5

Each week Phil, from Phil’s Quick Capsule Review, takes a look at a different movie or TV related Top Five.  This time out: Slasher Film Villains!

So a few rules: They have to have been in more than one film. They have to be masked/somehow hide their identity.  And they must have killed.  A lot.

Close but no cigar: Chucky, Norman Bates, Ghostface

 

5 –  Pinhead
From Hell itself comes Doug Bradley’s chilling coenobite, a relentless pin faced monster that’s as unstoppable as any other on this list with his own unique calling card.  The infamous Lament Configuration.

Watch: Hellriaser 3: Hell On Earth (1992)
Avoid: Hellraiser Revelations (2011)

 

4 – Leatherface
His face caked in the skin of his victims, loves meat hooks, freezers and will chase you down relentlessly with his chainsaw.  Also very much a family man.  In short: a 6 and a half foot brainless killing machine.

Watch: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
Avoid: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006)

 

3 – Jason Voorhees
Not the original villain from Friday The 13th (That was his loving mother), but from it’s first sequel onwards Jason proved to be as relentless and unstoppable as any slasher movie icon.  Adopting his machete and hockey mask in Part 3 it was all over by Part 4’s final chapter.  Until lightning brought him back. And telekinesis.  And space. And a reboot.  His rein of terror continues to this day.

Watch: Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter (1984)
Avoid: Friday The 13th Part 7: The New Blood (1988)

2 – Michael Myers
Michael Myers in truth is why this list exists.  Without the William Shatner faced stalker of Jamie Lee Curtis NONE of these (with the exception of Leatherface) would exist.  A true icon of the genre, in what is by far the best slasher movie ever made.

Watch: Halloween (1978)
Avoid: Halloween 2 (2009)

 

1 – Freddy Krueger
Whilst most copied the relentless silent Killer model set up by Michael Myers, Freddy was something a little different.  A wise cracking burnt to a crisp child killer, Kruger haunted your dreams until brutally killing you with his razor fingers.  Wes Craven created what is the true Slasher film icon in Krueger, who would shine no matter how bad the film he was in.

Watch: A Nightmare On Elm Street (1984)
Avoid: A Nightmare On Elm Street (2010)

 

 

Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Other Cr*p Top 5

In a new semi-regular feature each week Phil takes a lookout a different movie related Top Five… this time out: Low Budget Films.

Yup sub $300k movie making at it’s finest.  And bloodiest. It’s no surprise that it’s horror that tends to shine in this budget level, with scares and blood taking the place of cast and effects.  Here are my top 5 low budget films.

Close but no cigar: El Mariachi, Cube, Brick, Bad Taste, Paranormal Activity, Halloween

5 – The Evil Dead
Sam Rami followed in The Texas Chainsaw’s shoes , delivering one of the most famous ‘video nasties’ on the 80’s with The Evil Dead, a movie whose characters and legacy still carries on today.  See the original uncut version for the full on Evil Dead experience.

4 – Night of The Living Dead
Romero launched a genre with Night of The Living Dead, tacked race politics and scared the bejesus out of people. Night was years ahead of its time and spawned two equally impressive sequels. Today it stands as a key influencer on modern TV and movies.

3 – Clerks
Love him or hate him (and mostly hate with his latest few films), Kevin Smith pulled a blinder with Clerks – a mostly one location comedy with memorable dialogue and even more memorable characters.  Made with credit cards, luck and a degree of bullshit Clerks still stands up today as a damn funny, raw movie.

2 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Whilst it has dated badly, the original TCM was and still is somewhat of a phenomenon.  Banned in the UK for over twenty years, Chainsaw broke new ground in horror filmmaking with it’s raw handheld style, a style that would influence films like Evil Dead and Blair Witch years later. 

1 – Blair Witch Project
Like TCM before it, the directors of Blair Witch would never top their debut film, a film which for a long time was the most profitable movie ever made (overtaken latterly by Paranormal Activity). It launched a sub genre (the found footage film) and showed what you could do with no money but a great idea, presented alongside a one of cinemas best marketing campaigns. Like it or hate it, it changed filmmaking.