Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Tarantino & Once Upon A Time In Hollywood: The Whole Bloody Affair

Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Tarantino & Once Upon A Time In Hollywood: The Whole Bloody Affair

Ross and Phil Talk Movies The Podcasts

On this episode of the podcast we combine BOTH our recent Quentin Tarantino/ Once Upon A Time In Hollywood podcasts into the one super long episode it was always meant to be.  Yes ladies and gents this is: Ross And Phil Talk… Tarantino & Once Upon A Time In Hollywood: The Whole Bloody Affair

Hosted by Award winning filmmaker Ross Boyask and blogger/writer/failed former filmmaker Phil Hobden.

Discussed: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, Jackie Brown, Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill, Quentin Tarantino, Margot Robbie, Bruce Lee, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Serenity, Ma

For more on Ross Boyask search @RossBoyask on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. Also check out @EvoFilmsUK online.

For more on Phil Hobden check out www.philhobden.co.uk , Twitter (@PhilQuickReview) and Instagram (RossAndPhilTalkMovies

#RossAndPhil #RossAndPhilTalkMovies #MoviePodcasts #Podcasts

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Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (Spoilers) 

Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (Spoilers) 

Ross and Phil Talk Movies The Podcasts

On this episode of the podcast we talk Once Upon A Time In Hollywood as Ross has finally seen it.  And shocker… he liked it. A Lot.  Could this be Tarantino back on form? Warning: Spoilers ahead.

Hosted by Award winning filmmaker Ross Boyask and blogger/writer/failed former filmmaker Phil Hobden.

Discussed: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, Jackie Brown, Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill, Quentin Tarantino, Margot Robbie, Bruce Lee, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Serenity, Ma, Angel Has Fallen, Speed, He Who Dares Wins, White House Down, Dragons Forever, Joker, IT, Silence, The Irishman, The Last Movie Star

For more on Ross Boyask search @RossBoyask on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. Also check out @EvoFilmsUK online.

For more on Phil Hobden check out www.philhobden.co.uk , Twitter (@PhilQuickReview) and Instagram (RossAndPhilTalkMovies

#RossAndPhil #RossAndPhilTalkMovies #MoviePodcasts #Podcasts

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Blog: All Things Film – The Revenant Reviewed

Blog: All Things Film – The Revenant Reviewed

All Things Film Blog Other Cr*p Uncategorized

Not since Mel Gibson put poor ol’ Caviezel through the endless whips and chains as Jesus Christ in The Passion of the Christ have we seen one man being put through umpteen ways of nearly being killed. In fact, I am sure Hugh Glass, DiCaprio’s character, dies at several points in the movie. There’s not much distinction between that and hallucination, for my money.

The Revenant is set in 1823, where a bunch of furriers are scaling the nether regions of deepest, coldest terrain to hunt and kill animals for their fur. Along for the ride if Tom Hardy, torn straight out of the Penguin Guide to Bad Guys Who Love Money series, and Domhnall Gleeson who’s the arbiter of everyone’s safety. Leo’s son is along for the ride.

It’s not long before Leo gets mauled to tits by an angry bear and left for dead by his gang. Hardy commits an indefensibly predictable/silly/nasty* act and hightails it off back to safety. Leo can barely move, and for the remaining two-and-a-half week run time, he’ll get kicked and punched, buried alive, dive off a cliff on horseback and – in the film’s strangest moment – enact his favourite scene from Freddy Got Fingered and spend the night inside a horse carcass.

Alejandro González Iñárritu is the director once again of what is surely going to win Leo his best actor Oscar. Birdman was my favourite film of 2015. Now, with The Revenant, we can see his distinct trademark style; the roving camera that likes to seamlessly blend all sorts of action and intrusive closeups to draw attention away from the machinery. The cinematography is astounding, considering they only used natural light.

Less astounding is the length of time it takes to cram this survivalist fable, along with its incessant insistence of shoehorning what can only be described as the Guy Ritchie version of existentialism (remember Revolver?) into the narrative to underscore the fact that the Glass character needs to survive in the face of loss and extreme weather conditions. It could have been done in a clean 120 minutes. Alejandro wants his cake and, not only eats it, but buys another and punches it down his own throat.

There’s an undeniable gritty and raw sense of machismo in The Revenant. It’s no more deep than your average revenge movie of the eighties. But, there you have it – only on the big screen will you be immersed (I’m sure it’ll lose something in *other* avenues of screening) – it’s loud, it’s cold and it’s biting… and the 150+ minute run time will only add to the survivalist, endurance-soaked nature of the content. If (like me) you’ve spent a large portion of your adult life wanting to see Leonardo DiCaprio being repeatedly twatted, then this is the film for you.

 

Author: Andrew Mackay

 

To hear more on this review (and others like it) make sure you download our very own show, The Film Podcast! 

Blog: Grosse Point Geek – 10 Fantastic Films You Have Most Likely Never Heard Of…

Blog: Grosse Point Geek – 10 Fantastic Films You Have Most Likely Never Heard Of…

A Blog Grosse Point Geek Uncategorized

As a result of having seen far too many films for my own good  – I have come across quite a few that have seemed to go completely  unnoticed by the general film going public.

Now don’t confuse the list below with my Top Ten Guilty Movie Pleasures – no indeed  – the following productions  are not just an acquired taste but are in fact brilliant films that criminally never found a sustained and committed audience.

Most are still available on dvd and I would recommend them all most highly. Read on:

 

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  1. Switchback (1997)

Director: Jeb Stuart

Actors: Dennis Quaid, Danny Glover, Jared Leto

Thriller about an obsessed FBI agent (Quaid) playing cat and mouse with a serial killer which may be Danny Glover and/or Jared Leto. Well made, superbly directed, tremendous performances from all three leads and a very exciting final 15minutes. A proper undiscovered classic.

Best Bit: The above mentioned last 15 minutes  – in a word  – thrilling.

 

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  1. Desperate Measures (1998)

Director: Barbet Shroeder

Actors: Andy Garcia, Michael Keaton

A father and a convicted murderer face off against each other in this very tense and fast paced actioner. Garcia is a cop who badly needs Keaton’s incarcerated nutcase’s bone marrow for his dying son, unfortunately Keaton has other plans and makes a bid for escape, cue a kind of Die Hard in a hospital  set up, with lots of chases, gun fights and Jerry Goldsmiths pounding score. Very entertaining with really good work from both main actors.

Best Bit: The escape sequence – all hell breaks loose as Keaton’s Peter McCabe launches a full on and very violent bid for freedom.

 

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  1. Split Second (1997)

Directors: Tony Maylam and Ian Sharp

Actors: Rutger Hauer, Kim Cattrall, Neil Duncan

Long forgotten Brit Sci Fi, set in a futuristic and partially submerged London. A supernatural serial killer is on the loose and its up to Rutger Hauer’s unhinged cop and his naïve partner (Neil Duncan) to track him down.

Bonkers film, really well made, loads of fun, with a great turn from Hauer, and some tremendous fast paced action.

Best bit: When Neil Duncan’s rookie cop Dick Durkin finds out what his partner’s first name is (its Harley) and cant stop laughing. Sounds a bit daft to pick a scene like this from a straight up actioner  – but its so well played by both actors that you just cant help loving it.

 

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  1. What’s Eating Gilbert Grape? (1993)

Director: Lasse Halstrom

Actors: Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio

DiCaprio deservedly got an supporting Oscar nom for his amazing performance as a mentally challenged teenage boy, with  Johnny Depp equally good as his long suffering older brother. To be honest not a great deal actually happens but the characters, writing and Halstrom’s direction are so good that it doesn’t really matter. A must watch movie – even if its just to see how brilliant  DiCaprio is.

Best Bit: Basically every scene DiCaprio is in.

 

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  1. Jabberwocky (1977)

Director: Terry Gilliam

Actors: Michael Palin, Warren Mitchell, Max Wall, Harry H Corbett

Absolutely hilarious medieval comedy about a well meaning idiot (Palin) who somehow finds himself in the middle of an English city besieged by a flesh eating monster. Gilliam’s film is rich in gut busting laughs and incredible production design. A must for all fans of Monty Python.

Best bit: When Palin’s Dennis Cooper grabs his chance to sneak into the city just as a member of the Kings  guard takes anextremely loud bowel movement. Has to be seen to be believed –  still makes me laugh.

 

* * * * * *

  1. Capricorn One (1977)

Director: Peter Hyams

Actors: Elliott Gould, James Brolin.

Realising that their planned Mars mission is doomed to failure, the powers that be at NASA decide to fool everyoneby instigating a massive cover up and staging a fake landing instead.

However they don’t reckon for Gould’s dogged reporter and Brolin’s tough as nails astronaut. Cracking film, with a witty and at times very funny script, whip smart direction from Hyams and a fantastic helicopter vs biplane finale.

Best Bit: Desperately looking for the escaped astronauts – Gould pays a visit to A and A Crop dusting, where tries to hire a plane from a very bad tempered Telly Salvalas:   “you ain’t no farmer, you ain’t got no crops and I think you’re a pervert!”

 

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  1. Second-hand Lions (2003)

Director: Tim McCanlies

Actors: Haley Joel Osment, Michael Caine, Robert Duvall

Osment plays a young lad sent to live with his cantankerous uncles (Duvall and Caine) who may or may not be a. stinking rich and b. former soldiers of fortune. Extremely likeable film that has a great feel good factor and top notch performances from all three leads – still available on dvd and well worth checking out.

Best bit: Where Duvall finally gives Osment his famous “what it is to be a man” speech – something every boy should hear at least once in his life.

 

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  1. White Squall (1996)

Director: Ridley Scott

Actors: Jeff Bridges, Caroline Goodall

Coming of age drama  – Jeff Bridges is the captain of a school sailing boat  destroyed by the White Squall of the title. Based on a true story, this came and  went when it was released – odd really as Scott is such a big director one would have thought that it would have been embraced by a much bigger audience. Superbly written, beautifully photographed with another faultless turn from Bridges and some very polished performances from the young cast – which includes early roles for Scott Wolfe and Ryan Philippe.

Best bit: The scene on the tropical island where the boys climb a huge hill and discover a book signed by lots of others who have made the same journey.

 

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9. Razorback (1984)

Director: Russell Mulcahy

Actors: Gregory Harrison, Bill Kerr.

This weird but very well made film was the feature debut of Russell Mulcahy who went on to direct Highlander. Basically Jaws in the Outback but without the shark  – superbly directed, with inventive cinematography and a great bit of acting from Kerr (Gallipoli)  –  unfairly maligned on release but incredibly entertaining with some genuinely scary sequences.

Best bit: Kerr finally coming face to face with the Razorback at an abandoned watering hole.

 

* * * * * *

10. Roswell (1994)

Director: Jeremy Kagan

Actors: Kyle MacLachlan, Martin Sheen, Dwight Yoakam

Actually a TV movie  – this tells the story of the infamous 1947 Roswell UFO Incident. Told from the view point of McLachlan’s Maj. Jesse Marcel, we find out what actually may have happened and what the US govt. did to cover it up. Very good acting from all the cast,  well written with a superbly told story.

Best bit: Yoakam’s chilling throwaway line – “you’ve heard about little green men?……….well they aint green”

 

 

Author: Will Strong 

 

Review: Out Of The Furnace (Cinema)

Review: Out Of The Furnace (Cinema)

Other Cr*p Uncategorized

The Review: As nice as it is to see Christian Bale not playing a campy superhero, there seems to be mostly only one setting he goes for, lately; that of the slightly angry, mostly psychotic revenge-fuelled layabout.

Out of the Furnace is no different. Here, Bale plays a mill worker who’s relatively happy shacked up with Zoe Saldana (and who wouldn’t be?) and generally getting on with life. His younger brother, Rodney, played by Casey Affleck is a war veteran deeply shaken to the core by his adventures and trying to make ends meet by involving himself in illicit bare knuckle boxing matches.

Of course this won’t turn out well. Affleck mostly steals the show as the dim-witted brother who enlists the services of a local kingpin (Daefo) to go and fight a few rounds under the supervision of DeGroat (Woody Harrelson, channeling Mickey Knox) – the USA’s most evillest, violent and balding crime lord since Ben Kingsley’s Don Logan.

It’s all played perfectly well. Bale does all he can to say the line “Rodney, You PLONKER!” at almost every turn. Affleck convinces us that he’s a no good, shell-shocked nitwit. He manages to continue to convince us with his performance in this film, too. Scott “Crazy Heart” Cooper’s direction is at once quiet and under-laboured – a welcome follow-up to the gushing Jeff Bridges starrer a couple of years back.
Sadly, all this grandiose blatancy is underserved by a script perfectly willing to throttle along one two major plot contrivances. Bale, early on, involves himself in a car crash. It’s a stone in the shoe of the film’s overall message, and certainly surplus to requirement. It’s a plot device enabling him to fester anger and defy the odds of engaging the world’s most ruthless badass on his own turf. It’s extremely unnecessary given the certainty of the material and feels more at home in a Scott Adkins picture.

Next up – in what I consider to be this year’s head-slapping “Oh WHY did you bother doing that?!” moment, a cell phone is accidentally knocked out of a pocket and records a damning indictment for two characters who meet their demise shortly after. The pious artificiality of this action and when it occurs – conveniently before both men are executed – donkey punches the believability of the movie right at the time when it’s most needed.

And then there’s the end. It’s satisfying, all right. It’s the payoff we expect and we deserve. Take this beginning and ending – and a rather edifying, if fleeting, repatriation between Bale and Saldana’s estranged lovers on a railway bridge – and you have one of the movies of the year. But take into account the liberal use of mistrust of an audience’s appreciation for not being treated like cretins in two moments such as the ones I’ve describe, then the filmmaker’s shouldn’t be surprised at a reaction like mine.

We’re not dumb. Casey Affleck is dumb.

And I’m not knocking off at least two points for the middle finger, thankyouverymuch

Reviewed By: Andrew Mackay

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Review: The Wolf of Wall Street (Cinema)

Review: The Wolf of Wall Street (Cinema)

All Things Film Blog The Blogs

The Review:  As a huge Scorsese fan I was waiting with baited breath for the fifth collaboration between Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio, The Departed and Gangs of New York were excellent, The Aviator and Shutter Island less so. The latest offering is based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, a young self starter who is working his way through the pecking order to become a stockbroker, Jordan passes his exams and his first day as a fully certified broker turns out to be Black Monday where the Stock Market crashed and the company he worked for went under.

Desperate to pursue his dreams, Jordon starts off by selling Penny Shares, low return investments to everyday folk and pocketing a hefty 50% commission. A chance meeting sees Jordan partner up with Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill) and they start their own company which grows at alarming rates. Now he is getting some recognition and a bit of a reputation, Forbes Magazine dub Jordan “The Wolf of Wall Street” due to his dubious methods of suckering people into parting with their money, this only spurs him on and leads to a queue of people wanting to work for him.

Lavish lifestyles, drugs and shady deals can only continue for so long without consequences which Jordan may find out when the FBI start looking into his dealings.

From the dwarf tossing opening scene Scorsese has the viewer hooked, the cinematography is lavish, the dialogue is crisp and sharp and at the centre is DiCaprio turning in possibly his best ever performance. Jordan is young, brash, determined and unapologetic and would happily sell his grandmother some useless stock as long as he got his money off the back end, characters like this are supposed to be vile and repulsive but DiCaprio’s Jordan oozes charm and sincerity and is incredibly likable especially the way he whips his workers into a frenzy each day which is reminiscent of a preacher at a church service .

Jonah Hill proved he could act in a serious film with his Oscar nominated performance in Moneyball, here, he is the perfect foil for DiCaprio’s Jordan. Donnie idolizes Jordan and will do anything to be successful, he also shares Jordan’s love of all things narcotic which leads to probably the funniest moment you will see this year.

Scorsese nods to fellow directors by casting them in the film, there are parts for Spike Jones, Jon Favreau and a fantastic performance from Rob Reiner as Jordan’s father. Apart from the two main leads, the Walking Dead’s Jon Bernthal, The Artist’s Jean Dujardin, and our very own Joanna Lumley relish in their roles without forgetting a possible Oscar baiting cameo from Matthew McConaughey.

Don’t waste your money on American Hustle; see how it should be done as The Wolf of Wall Street marks a return to form of one of the greatest living directors while its main stars deliver career best performances in one of the funniest and engrossing films of the year.

Reviewed By: Matt Duddy

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