Eye In The Sky – A Quick Capsule Review

Eye In The Sky – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
One of Alan Rickman’s last films, Eye In The Sky is a fitting tribute to one of the best actors of this generation.  His cold, stoic and levelled performance opposite and equally brilliant Helen Mirran sits at the heart of this tense morality play about drone usage in modern warfare.  And for a film with a handful of locations, minimal directorial flash and heavy on dialogue,  it’s those performances that makes or breaks a movie.  Okay so occasionally it borders on parody with the politicians, but it;’s a small issue in what is a very good film.

Best Bit: Rickman one last time.

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: 13 Hours, Black Hawk Down, Good Kill

IMDB Rating: 

 

Author: Phil Hobden

Blog: Good Kill – A Quick Capsule Review

Blog: Good Kill – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Good Kill simply put is the film American Sniper SHOULD have been. Expertly exploring the issues around modern day distance warfare and how the rules of engagement effect those doing tend dirty work the film is lead by a recent career best performance from Ethan Hawke and some taught direction from Andrew Niccol which never once strays into the obvious.  Overall if you hd to pick between this as Eastwood’s film this wins by a mile.

Best Bit: Justice

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: American Sniper, Lone Survivor, Black Hawk Down

 

Author: Phil Hobden

Blog: All Things Film – Good Kill (2015) Reviewed

Blog: All Things Film – Good Kill (2015) Reviewed

All Things Film Blog Other Cr*p Uncategorized

Andrew Niccol’s latest writer/director effort here makes no bones about its genesis. Bruce Greenwood, who plays Ethan Hawke’s commanding officer mentions that he’s none-too happy about the fact that XBOX has managed to train people to fly UAVs and hit targets several thousands of miles away.

There’s a curious detachment inherent in the job of operating these aircraft/bombing devices. Anyone who’s played the later installments of the Call of Duty franchise would know about the UAV episodes where you can spray machine gun bullets or drop a massive great bomb on enemies. Indeed, the whole film sort of plays out like this. Niccol’s primary objective is not too dissimilar to that of Clint Eastwood’s in American Sniper. But, where American Sniper was heavy-handed and full of cemented throat grabbing, Good Kill is more restrained. It allows Hawke to breathe more in his performance. And he doesn’t have to put in a stupid southern drawl, either.

And now on to Niccol; at home here without having to resort to anything truly fantastic or bizarre (see: In Time, Gattaca etc) we see his strong poker face and generally direct handling of the situation. The focus is really at home where his wife and kids are pottering around waiting for daddy to come home more disturbed than he did yesterday. Hassled by the sheer weightlessness of his job, and the distant connection he has with the decisions he makes, he trly does get more and more hassled by his work. It’s the surefire handiwork of a director more in tune with the characters than the audience; and in a film like this, that’s absolutely the best course of action.

I’ve no doubt people will give this a go expecting it to be gung-ho Americana writ large; but then, the sorts of people who wander into a movie named “Good Kill” probably don’t know who Andrew Niccol is, and the careful, sophisticated deliberation he can achieve with his own material. And that’s, sadly, the reason why Good Kill – despite being vastly superior to the likes of American Sniper – will take a back seat. Well, that, and the unfortunate timing of its release, anyway.

 

Author: Andrew Mackay

 

To hear more on this review (and others like it) make sure you download the Filmsploitation podcast, part of the All Things Film network.