Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Delays, Lockdown Movies & The Hunt

Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Delays, Lockdown Movies & The Hunt

Ross and Phil Talk Movies The Podcasts

On this episode of the podcast we talk about all the happenings in the world of film & TV – including release delays, #Marchalarts and our favourite films to watch on lock down. Warning: not a Corona virus free zone.

Hosted by Award winning filmmaker Ross Boyask and blogger/writer/failed former filmmaker Phil Hobden.

Discussed: The Hunt, No Time to Die, Mulan, F9, A Quiet Place Part 2, Housebound, Hostile Hostages, Room, The People Under The Stairs, The Hole, Night of the Living Dead (1990), The Purge, Hush, Panic Room, Bunny And The Ball, The Babysitter, The Stand, Ready Or Not, Better Watch Out, 10 Cloverfield, REC, Misery, The Order, Roadhouse, Evil Dead 2, You’re Next, Clue, Cube, Revenge Of The Ninja, American Ninja 4, Never Back Down, Right at Your Door, Lone Wolf McQuade, Rumble In The Bronx, The Collector, Dog Soldiers, Don’t Breathe, Better Watch Out, Switchblade Romance

For more on Ross Boyask search @RossBoyask on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. Also check out @EvoFilmsUK online.

For more on Phil Hobden check out www.philhobden.co.uk , Twitter (@PhilQuickReview) and Instagram (RossAndPhilTalkMovies

#RossAndPhil #RossAndPhilTalkMovies #MoviePodcasts #Podcasts

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Circle (2015) – A Quick Capsule Review

Circle (2015) – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
If you liked Saw, Cube or similar claustrophobic limited location horrors then likely Circle (Not The Circle – that’s a rubbish Netflix original) will be right up your street.  This low budget indie movie throws a bunch of random people in a room, killed off one by one by an unseen assailant.  To say anymore would give too much away but it’s easy to see why many people consider this to be one of the better films on Netflix you probably haven’t seen! Best of all it’s got a super tight runtime and a plot that keeps you guessing.  A great find!

Best Bit: The tense plotting…

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream (Netflix)

If You Liked this Try: Saw, Cube, The Room

 

 


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Cube (1997) – A Rewatched Quick Capsule Review

Cube (1997) – A Rewatched Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Cube was a break out 90’s hit that did a superb job at making the most of a very small budget, one location and a small cast.  Think Clerk’s with deadly traps.  It predated and influenced Saw and came around the time of break out low budget films like Blair Witch.  The 90’s was a really fun decade. However nostalgia aside, Cube has also aged less well than either of those films.  The effects and central concept still hold up but some of the acting can be pretty ropey at times and a slew of less regarded sequels and imitators has somewhat dampened its impact.  This all said it’s still a solid watch and shows what innovation can be done at a lower budget level.

Best Bit: Oh bugger.

Worth a Rewatch: Yes

If You Liked this Try: The Blair Witch Project, Saw, Clerks

 


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Escape Room (2019) – A Quick Capsule Review

Escape Room (2019) – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Escape Room is basically Saw light. In fact it’s so lacking in gore and real threat for the most part you wonder just how close it could have been to getting a 12 rating.  That’s not to say that it isn’t enjoyable. It is.  In fact Escape Room is a whole bundle of fun – if you don’t mind checking your brain at the door.  It doesn’t stick the landing sadly with a weirdly sequel focused denouement but the cast are good, the puzzles crazy and the story just about believable.

Best Bit: Pool

Buy, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: Saw, The Belko Experiment, Cube

 


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Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Other Cr*p Top 5

In a new semi-regular feature each week Phil takes a lookout a different movie related Top Five… this time out: Low Budget Films.

Yup sub $300k movie making at it’s finest.  And bloodiest. It’s no surprise that it’s horror that tends to shine in this budget level, with scares and blood taking the place of cast and effects.  Here are my top 5 low budget films.

Close but no cigar: El Mariachi, Cube, Brick, Bad Taste, Paranormal Activity, Halloween

 

5 – The Evil Dead
Sam Rami followed in The Texas Chainsaw’s shoes , delivering one of the most famous ‘video nasties’ on the 80’s with The Evil Dead, a movie whose characters and legacy still carries on today.  See the original uncut version for the full on Evil Dead experience.

 

4 – Night of The Living Dead
Romero launched a genre with Night of The Living Dead, tacked race politics and scared the bejesus out of people. Night was years ahead of its time and spawned two equally impressive sequels. Today it stands as a key influencer on modern TV and movies.

 

3 – Clerks
Love him or hate him (and mostly hate with his latest few films), Kevin Smith pulled a blinder with Clerks – a mostly one location comedy with memorable dialogue and even more memorable characters.  Made with credit cards, luck and a degree of bullshit Clerks still stands up today as a damn funny, raw movie.

 

2 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Whilst it has dated badly, the original TCM was and still is somewhat of a phenomenon.  Banned in the UK for over twenty years, Chainsaw broke new ground in horror filmmaking with it’s raw handheld style, a style that would influence films like Evil Dead and Blair Witch years later. 

 

1 – Blair Witch Project
Like TCM before it, the directors of Blair Witch would never top their debut film, a film which for a long time was the most profitable movie ever made (overtaken latterly by Paranormal Activity). It launched a sub genre (the found footage film) and showed what you could do with no money but a great idea, presented alongside a one of cinemas best marketing campaigns. Like it or hate it, it changed filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

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Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Phil’s Top 5… Low Budget Films

Other Cr*p Top 5

In a new semi-regular feature each week Phil takes a lookout a different movie related Top Five… this time out: Low Budget Films.

Yup sub $300k movie making at it’s finest.  And bloodiest. It’s no surprise that it’s horror that tends to shine in this budget level, with scares and blood taking the place of cast and effects.  Here are my top 5 low budget films.

Close but no cigar: El Mariachi, Cube, Brick, Bad Taste, Paranormal Activity, Halloween

5 – The Evil Dead
Sam Rami followed in The Texas Chainsaw’s shoes , delivering one of the most famous ‘video nasties’ on the 80’s with The Evil Dead, a movie whose characters and legacy still carries on today.  See the original uncut version for the full on Evil Dead experience.

4 – Night of The Living Dead
Romero launched a genre with Night of The Living Dead, tacked race politics and scared the bejesus out of people. Night was years ahead of its time and spawned two equally impressive sequels. Today it stands as a key influencer on modern TV and movies.

3 – Clerks
Love him or hate him (and mostly hate with his latest few films), Kevin Smith pulled a blinder with Clerks – a mostly one location comedy with memorable dialogue and even more memorable characters.  Made with credit cards, luck and a degree of bullshit Clerks still stands up today as a damn funny, raw movie.

2 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Whilst it has dated badly, the original TCM was and still is somewhat of a phenomenon.  Banned in the UK for over twenty years, Chainsaw broke new ground in horror filmmaking with it’s raw handheld style, a style that would influence films like Evil Dead and Blair Witch years later. 

1 – Blair Witch Project
Like TCM before it, the directors of Blair Witch would never top their debut film, a film which for a long time was the most profitable movie ever made (overtaken latterly by Paranormal Activity). It launched a sub genre (the found footage film) and showed what you could do with no money but a great idea, presented alongside a one of cinemas best marketing campaigns. Like it or hate it, it changed filmmaking.