Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Bohemian Rhapsody (InstaTake) Updated!

Podcast: Ross And Phil Talk… Bohemian Rhapsody (InstaTake) Updated!

Ross and Phil Talk Movies The Podcasts

 

On this episode of the podcast Phil delivers his InstaTake on the Queen/Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody.

Hosted by Award winning filmmaker Ross Boyask and blogger/writer/failed filmmaker Phil Hobden.

Films Discussed:Bohemian Rhapsody

#RossAndPhil #RossAndPhilTalkMovies #MoviePodcasts #Podcasts

For more on Phil Hobden check out www.philhobden.co.uk , Twitter (@PhilQuickReview) and Instagram (RossAndPhilTalkMovies)
For more on Ross Boyask search @RossBoyask on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook

   

 


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Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) – A Quick Capsule Review

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) – A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Bohemian Rhapsody has had a pretty rough critical reception so far and, for the most part, having watched the movie it seems pretty unfair.  Yes this is a surface deep look at the career of Queen and Freddie Mercury and yes it does ignore many of the darker elements of the lead singers life. But with a central performance as good as that delivered by Rami Malek at the centre and THAT music you almost forgive some of its weaker moments.  And the film does have them – the film doesn’t nail the battle Freddie has with his sexuality and Live Aid for one seems oddly cheap at times but thankfully the film (just) sticks the landing on that one.  So Queen fans will love it but more than that there’s a fascinating story at the centre of the film and one that people should see.

Best Bit:Bohemian Rhapsody

Cinema, Stream, Avoid: Stream

If You Liked this Try: The Doors, Get On Up, Sid & Nancy 

 


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Lovelace: A Quick Capsule Review

Lovelace: A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Lovelace isn’t Boogie Nights. In fact it’s only just a step up from a Hallmark movie of the week, which is a shame because at it’s core is a solid and often brave performance from Amanda Seyfried but she’s let down by a one sided story, flat direction and a sense of always trying to be more than it is. A missed opportunity.

Best Bit: Seyfried is excellant.

Rent, Borrow, Buy, Stream: Stream

If you liked this try: Boogie Nights (8/10); Behind The Candelabra (5/10); Jobs (5/10)

Review: jOBS (DVD/BluRay- USA)

Review: jOBS (DVD/BluRay- USA)

Uncategorized

The Review:  When the sad news the Apple creator and tech wizard Steve Jobs had died, most people figured it would only be a matter of time before his life was turned into a movie.  With the popular book by Walter Isaacson released short after his death, a movie announcement followed.  West Wing & Social Network writer Aaron Sorkin would be in charge of the script, guaranteeing this studio backed film would be a must see.  But whilst almost two years later the Sorkin film is still being developed, another Steve Jobs film slipped out into the world.  And unfortunately this one stars Ashton Kutcher.

This story of Steve Jobs’, tells of his ascension from college dropout into one of the most revered creative entrepreneurs of the 20th century, through his initial tenure at Apple, his controversial ousting and his eventual return to what would become a golden age at the Palo Alto based company.

Very much an independently produced love letter, Joshua Michael Stern previously best known for his film Swing Vote with Kevin Costner (no, me neither) directs his own screenplay, in a film he produced and no doubt made the tea on as well.

And in a sentence that’s what’s wrong with jOBS… whist it flirts with being an interesting film , due to its TV movie of the week feel and overblown musical cues, it never quite makes it.  Even more so it makes the critical error of skirting around the ‘real’ Jobs, polishing the rougher edges that made the man what he was, and what he was liked and loathed for in equal measure.

If you have read Isaacson’s book (which I have), this film adds very little to the mix.  In fact what it does add is probably embellishment , rumour and supposition rather than fact and often shown through such rose tinted glasses (Steve is Good!  The Apple board were bad!)  that you’d think the renownedly difficult jOBS hardly ever put a foot wrong.

Also in compressing such a dense and event filled life, the film often skips over massive chunks of his story, leaving out the things that made Jobs the man he was, both good and bad.

It’s not all bad.  The cast is very good, not least Kutcher, who shares more than a passing resemblance  to his subject matter and manages to mostly drop the irritating ticks and traits that made his more recent career almost unbearable to watch. Whilst the film never shakes off it’s TV movie feel, the story it tells is an interesting one.  Just one that also could have been better served by a writer-director with a slightly less rose tinted view of events and people, with a willingness to do something less linear or narratively predictable (someone like Aaron Sorkin maybe!)

In short: If jOBS had been an Apple product, it would no doubt have been sent back for more refinement.  Well at least under the regime of Steve Jobs, anyway.

Reviewed By: Phil Hobden


jOBS currently has no scheduled release date in the UK.  Join the debate on our Facebook group… http://www.facebook.com/groups/filmsploitationpodcast/

The Bling Ring: A Quick Capsule Review

The Bling Ring: A Quick Capsule Review

Quick Review

Phil’s Quick Capsule Review:
Every so often a film comes along that’s full of such amazingly interesting characters, doing amazingly fabulous things that everyone just HAS to see.  Bling Ring isn’t that film.  It thinks it is.  But it isn’t. Full of it’s own amazingness, director Coppola is convinced that a vacuous film about vacuous people doing vacuous things is interesting.  And whilst the story is of some regard, the way the film is shot, full of self importance and you known Amazingness just leaves you wishing they had all been given the death sentence.

Best Bit: Emma Watson is very good.

Rent, Borrow, Buy, Stream: Borrow

IMDB Rating: 

If you liked this try: Rush (9/10); Marie Antoinette  (4/10); Lost In Translation (UR)

Review: Behind The Candelabra (DVD/BR)

Review: Behind The Candelabra (DVD/BR)

Other Cr*p Uncategorized

The Review: Why on Earth this movie was forced to bypass a theatrical release and go to straight to TV is gobsmacking, to me. HBO financed this true story of Liberace long-term fling with young ranch hunk Scott Thorson and so, to paraphrase by the powers that be, was “far too gay for commercial release”. In the UK and Europe it has a theatrical run. I guess that tells you everything you need to know about the prejudicial stability at each end of the pond.

Recently, I was engaged in a discussion on with a fellow movie nutter about director Steven Soderbergh’s oeuvre; he decided that Soderbergh had made some very good films. I argued that he’s made maybe two “great” films; the first, obviously, being Sex Lies & Videotape and the second, the little seen Schizopolis from 1996. After dreck like Haywire, The Oceans Trilogy (despite the third being a lot of fun) and The fucking Limey, I thought my love affair with his work was over; and now comes a most surprising and genuine heartfelt one-two punch in Behind the Candelabra.

Michael Douglas plays Liberace and his performance is absolutely outstanding. He’s nailed the guy right down to the bone; flamboyant and persuasive, yet underneath really quite selfish and conniving. We meet Scott Thorson, the real central character of the movie, who scores backstage passes with his friend and eventually sparks fly between him and the much older ‘queen’. Thorson here is played, once again, absolutely brilliantly by Matt Damon.

Rob Lowe, a slightly underused Dan Aykroyd and Paul Reiser appear in bit parts – but, get this; Rob Lowe is flat-out crazily awesome as the cosmetic doctor who himself has had so much surgery, that my long-time wish of seeing Rob Lowe look like a reject from the Korean story of Cloud Atlas has finally come true. It’s nice seeing Douglas, Lowe and Aykroyd on the screen once again in the same film. The youngster who spent his life in the cinema in the eighties felt very nostalgic.

This is almost certainly a performance film; it’s about performance, by performers. The recreation of the late seventies/early eighties is spot on. The feel and tone of the movie is spot on. And yet, those who admonished Brokeback Mountain because of its male-on-male action won’t bother with this one. For fuck’s sake, grow up if this is you. Really. Be warned. Behind the Candelabra is gay. It’s gayer than a gay festival on a national gay day celebrating gayness by having a massive gay gang bang. With gays.

It’s nearly as gay as Commando. Nearly.

There’s obviously very, very little of it on screen, but certainly the passion and chemistry between Douglas and Damon is electric. I was sold.

To go into detail about the story would be to spoil it if, like me, you don’t know terribly much about what occurred between the two old queens; it involved a lot of plastic surgery and a lot of versatility talk, negotiation and, ultimately, a sense of bittersweet doom.

So, I shall leave you with this; Watch this for the performances, both behind and in front of the camera. Behind the Candelabra is Soderbergh proving once again that he’s more an actor’s director than anything else – and, girlfriend, he’s still “got it” – and what he has got here, at the very least, is three of this year’s best performances in what is without question one of the best, most passionate and colourful films of the year.

 

Reviewed By: Andrew MacKay

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